Leftover Turkey Recipes

Roasted Chicken Or Turkey / Photo Credit: FrameAngel via FreeDigitalPhotos.net / Leftover Turkey Recipes
Photo Credit: FrameAngel via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Leftover turkey is good for 4 days in the refrigerator. Here are recipes and tips to save money and reuse that leftover turkey (and other leftover foods) without getting food poisoning (also called food borne illness).

(Like what you read? Be sure to subscribe for new posts!)

Recipes for leftover turkey

(These are also good recipes to use already cooked or roasted chicken.)

Tips for using leftovers safely

Eating leftovers is a great way to save money and is better than letting the food go to waste, but be careful to prevent yourself from getting food poisoning:

  1. Keep your refrigerator below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius).
  2. Label leftovers with the date they were made, so that you can keep track of how long they’ve been in the fridge.
  3. Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit (75 degrees Celsius).
  4. Use an app like Is My Food Safe? (free for Apple and Android) or Leftovers ($0.99 in iTunes app store). These apps tell you how long food is good for, what temperatures they need reach when cooking and reheating, and information on food poisoning. Is My Food Safe also has a kitchen safety quiz and an Ask an Expert feature.

How long do leftovers last in the refrigerator?

This is a general list. Please use your common sense and best judgement – “When in doubt, throw it out!” If it doesn’t look, smell, or taste like it did when you put it in the fridge, it may be a good idea to throw it away.

  • Meat, poultry, seafood: 3-4 days
  • Soup, stew, chili: 3-4 days
  • Packaged lunch meat: 3-5 days after opening
  • Vegetable salad: 1-2 days
  • Cooked vegetables: 2-3 days
  • Pasta or potato salad: 3-5 days
  • Rice, pasta: 2-7 days
  • Stuffing: 1-2 days
  • Pie: 2-3 days

For more information, read…

Do your leftovers add up to a safe meal?
Refrigerator Calculator Printable from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (very conservative on some foods, for example: rice is only listed as 1-2 days)

Food Safety: Foodborne Germs and Illnesses
FAQ page from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Any video appearing below this line is advertising and not part of this post
__________________________________________________________

Advertisements

Author: Shelly Najjar

MPH in Public Health Nutrition, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist // Freelance Writer, Community Builder // I have a very long Goal List (Bucket List) and I enjoy doing nail art.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s