Start a budget – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

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This week’s tip is from Dave Ramsey, a personal financial expert and best-selling author. Plus, if you’re ready to get started with your own budget, his public relations team mentioned EveryDollar, a free budget software created by Ramsey Solutions and accessible from your desktop, iPhone and Android.

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Start a budget
When you do, you’ll feel like you got a raise. And who doesn’t want that? Poor money management causes stress. It affects marriages and families and even your health! You can do this! Tell your money what to do instead of wondering where it went.

Dave Ramsey
Personal finance expert and best-selling author

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information

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Looking in the wrong place for nutrition information can cause you to make unnecessary or harmful diet changes, give up foods you don’t need to, and waste money on special supplements and products.

How do you know what information you can trust, whether online, from friends, or in the news?

Join me in the Diabetes Smart Online Symposium to learn how to determine whether a source is credible, and get ideas for where to turn for accurate nutrition information.

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information
Tuesday, June 7 at 3pm Pacific Time
FREE and open to the public
SIGN UP TODAY!

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Don’t be gullible. Sign up for my class and stop falling for bad nutrition information.

New Series: 8 Dimensions of Wellness

Image from http://wellbeing.wsu.edu/what-is-wellbeing/ © 2012 Washington State University
Image from http://wellbeing.wsu.edu/what-is-wellbeing/
© 2012 Washington State University

Wellness usually means a wholistic approach to health and prevention of disease. The wellness wheel captures the idea that wellness isn’t only physical health, but includes many aspects of how you live your life and interact with people and situations. It is also called the wellbeing wheel, dimensions of health, etc.

There are multiple versions with varying number of sections, but since I first saw this wheel as an undergraduate student at Washington State University, I will describe the version they use.

Each section of the wheel represents a different part of wellness. The sections overlap and are all related, with one affecting the others, but to keep it simple, they are listed as separate sections:

(links in previous list go to the post about that aspect of wellness)

I mostly talk about physical wellness on this blog, but I am going to start expanding that focus to incorporate more information and resources from all parts of this wheel diagram. Over the next few months, I will write several posts that explain each of these sections of the wellness wheel and provide examples and resources for you to use.

I hope you will join me in learning more about health and wellness. Click here if you want to get each of the posts in your inbox for free and haven’t already signed up.

Leftover Turkey Recipes

Roasted Chicken Or Turkey / Photo Credit: FrameAngel via FreeDigitalPhotos.net / Leftover Turkey Recipes
Photo Credit: FrameAngel via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Leftover turkey is good for 4 days in the refrigerator. Here are recipes and tips to save money and reuse that leftover turkey (and other leftover foods) without getting food poisoning (also called food borne illness).

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Recipes for leftover turkey

(These are also good recipes to use already cooked or roasted chicken.)

Tips for using leftovers safely

Eating leftovers is a great way to save money and is better than letting the food go to waste, but be careful to prevent yourself from getting food poisoning:

  1. Keep your refrigerator below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius).
  2. Label leftovers with the date they were made, so that you can keep track of how long they’ve been in the fridge.
  3. Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit (75 degrees Celsius).
  4. Use an app like Is My Food Safe? (free for Apple and Android) or Leftovers ($0.99 in iTunes app store). These apps tell you how long food is good for, what temperatures they need reach when cooking and reheating, and information on food poisoning. Is My Food Safe also has a kitchen safety quiz and an Ask an Expert feature.

How long do leftovers last in the refrigerator?

This is a general list. Please use your common sense and best judgement – “When in doubt, throw it out!” If it doesn’t look, smell, or taste like it did when you put it in the fridge, it may be a good idea to throw it away.

  • Meat, poultry, seafood: 3-4 days
  • Soup, stew, chili: 3-4 days
  • Packaged lunch meat: 3-5 days after opening
  • Vegetable salad: 1-2 days
  • Cooked vegetables: 2-3 days
  • Pasta or potato salad: 3-5 days
  • Rice, pasta: 2-7 days
  • Stuffing: 1-2 days
  • Pie: 2-3 days

For more information, read…

Do your leftovers add up to a safe meal?
Refrigerator Calculator Printable from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (very conservative on some foods, for example: rice is only listed as 1-2 days)

Food Safety: Foodborne Germs and Illnesses
FAQ page from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

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How SMART are your resolutions?

Happy New Year!
Photo Credit: digitalart (FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

What kind of New Year’s Resolutions did you make? Was it something vague, like “Eat better,” or does it pass the SMART test?

When setting goals (resolutions included), many people use a technique I learned in school: make them SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely).

Specific

Put details in your goal so that you have a clearer idea of what you are planning on doing.

Measurable

Phrase the goal in a way that you can easily tell if you’ve accomplished it or not.

Attainable

Make a goal that you have the ability and resources to meet (or, make sure you have a plan to get the skills and resources you will need).

Realistic

Write your goal so that you do not have to be a miracle-worker to achieve it.

Timely

Include a deadline or time frame in your goal so that you know when to evaluate your progress.

Here are some generic examples with a few of the many possible changes to making SMART goals.

Generic or otherwise non-SMART SMART examples
  • Eat better
  • Eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables every day
  • Drink more water
  • Drink at least 8 glasses of water every day
  • Drink a glass of water before each meal or snack
  • Substitute a glass of water in the place of one soda every day
  • Work out
  • Do at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week
  • Attend an exercise class three times a week, after work
  • Be a better person
  • Volunteer for one hour on Tuesdays at the local food bank
  • Compliment a stranger every day
  • Lose weight
  • Lose 25 pounds, at a rate of 1 pound each week, through portion control and exercise
  • Meet with the dietitian monthly to discuss and plan realistic weight loss goals and progress
  • Get a better job
  • Apply to 3 jobs per week, until a new job contract is signed
  • Save money
  • Save $100 per month for the 2014 European summer vacation
  • Spend more time with family and friends
  • Host a monthly movie party for close friends
  • Eat Sunday family dinner each week

What are your resolutions? Do they pass the SMART test?

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