How to stabilize health compounds in chopped garlic – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This week’s tip is from Jill Weisenberger, Registered Dietitian and author of several nutrition books. She shares how to activate and stabilize garlic’s health-boosting compounds. You can find more simple tips like this in Jill’s second book The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition.

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Chop garlic 10 minutes before cooking.
Garlic likely decreases the risk of colorectal cancer and stomach cancer. It’s also studied for possible roles in heart disease prevention. Chopping or crushing garlic activates its natural health-boosting compounds. But heat instantly deactivates them. Allow the chopped or crushed garlic to sit at room temperature for at least 10 minutes before heating to stabilize the disease fighters.

–Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND, CHWC
Author, 21 Things You Need to Know about Diabetes and Your Heart and The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition

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Plan ahead for better success – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This One Small Change tip is from Torey Armul, a Registered Dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She encourages us to plan ahead for better wellness.

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Create a plan for what you’ll eat tomorrow, and when. Preparing and planning ahead is the key to success in any endeavor, including health and weight loss. Take a proactive role by creating a meal schedule, packing your foods ahead of time and setting personal reminders. Without a plan, it’s easy to lose track of your goals and lose control over your food environment (being surrounded by only unhealthy options, for example) and your appetite (going too long between meals builds the desire for unhealthy foods).

Torey Armul, MS, RD, CSSD
Registered Dietitian, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information

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Looking in the wrong place for nutrition information can cause you to make unnecessary or harmful diet changes, give up foods you don’t need to, and waste money on special supplements and products.

How do you know what information you can trust, whether online, from friends, or in the news?

Join me in the Diabetes Smart Online Symposium to learn how to determine whether a source is credible, and get ideas for where to turn for accurate nutrition information.

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information
Tuesday, June 7 at 3pm Pacific Time
FREE and open to the public
SIGN UP TODAY!

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Don’t be gullible. Sign up for my class and stop falling for bad nutrition information.

Introducing OSC:Wellness

New Series! OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

We all want to live our best lives possible, but sometimes that can seem overwhelming. There’s so many recommendations! Where do we start? Sometimes it feels better not to change anything.

Introducing OSC:Wellness. This new series will bring you “quick tip”changes for healthier living, in small, implementable ideas. Taking steps toward a more balanced life doesn’t mean massive overhauls of your current habits. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

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The first tip:

Drink a glass of water before every meal or snack you eat. (If you don’t like plain water, try flavoring it with herbs, citrus slices, or cucumbers). This has multiple benefits like maintaining hydration and reducing the likelihood of overeating or choosing a sugary beverage.

-Shelly Najjar, MPH, RDN
Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

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Beat-the-Heat Recipes (43 no-cook, microwave, slow-cooker, and outdoor grill recipes)

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Photo Credit: Ken Marshall via Flickr, Used unmodified under CC BY 2.0 license

If you don’t want to add to the heat by heating your oven or cooking on the stove, no-cook, microwave, and slow-cooker recipes are the way to go. Or, if you have shade, keep the cooking heat outdoors by cooking on the grill.

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18 NO-COOK Recipes

8 MICROWAVE Recipes

8 SLOW-COOKER Recipes

9 OUTDOOR GRILLING Recipes

Read more:

5 Quick and Healthy Meals without Using the Stove

25 Healthy Snacks for Kids (…or anyone. Many don’t require cooking)

Heart-healthy grilling recipes

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3 Health Lessons from Star Wars

Technology is your health accountability partner

R2-D2 and C3PO were created to help humans live better lives, and we have many tools that provide that same function today. From wearable tech and health-related apps that track steps, food, and medications to help you meet your health goals, to the availability of free recipes and health information online, technology makes it easier to live healthy lives.

Physical activity keeps you healthy

One of the most memorable scenes in the prequel trilogy was the fight between Yoda and Count Dooku. Yoda fights nimbly thanks to many hours spent in practice. Practicing martial arts (like light saber fights – or other more common activities like judo, karate, kickboxing, etc.) is just one way you can keep up your skills and meet the recommendation for 150 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week.

Protect your skin

Those oversized hoods on the cloaks do more than create ominous shadows. They also protect the wearer’s face from the harmful effects of solar radiation. You don’t need to live on a planet with two suns to be exposed to UV radiation. Earth’s sun is the major source of UV rays for most people, but tanning beds or occupational hazards can also contribute to UV exposure. To protect yourself from the effects of UV radiation (such as dryness, wrinkles, dark spots, cataracts, and even cancer) wear sunscreen, sunglasses, and avoid indoor tanning.

What other health lessons did I leave out? Leave a comment…