How to stabilize health compounds in chopped garlic – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This week’s tip is from Jill Weisenberger, Registered Dietitian and author of several nutrition books. She shares how to activate and stabilize garlic’s health-boosting compounds. You can find more simple tips like this in Jill’s second book The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition.

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Chop garlic 10 minutes before cooking.
Garlic likely decreases the risk of colorectal cancer and stomach cancer. It’s also studied for possible roles in heart disease prevention. Chopping or crushing garlic activates its natural health-boosting compounds. But heat instantly deactivates them. Allow the chopped or crushed garlic to sit at room temperature for at least 10 minutes before heating to stabilize the disease fighters.

–Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND, CHWC
Author, 21 Things You Need to Know about Diabetes and Your Heart and The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition

Be sure to sign up to make sure you don’t miss future wellness tips.

Plan ahead for better success – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This One Small Change tip is from Torey Armul, a Registered Dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She encourages us to plan ahead for better wellness.

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Create a plan for what you’ll eat tomorrow, and when. Preparing and planning ahead is the key to success in any endeavor, including health and weight loss. Take a proactive role by creating a meal schedule, packing your foods ahead of time and setting personal reminders. Without a plan, it’s easy to lose track of your goals and lose control over your food environment (being surrounded by only unhealthy options, for example) and your appetite (going too long between meals builds the desire for unhealthy foods).

Torey Armul, MS, RD, CSSD
Registered Dietitian, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Be sure to sign up to make sure you don’t miss future wellness tips.

Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information

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Looking in the wrong place for nutrition information can cause you to make unnecessary or harmful diet changes, give up foods you don’t need to, and waste money on special supplements and products.

How do you know what information you can trust, whether online, from friends, or in the news?

Join me in the Diabetes Smart Online Symposium to learn how to determine whether a source is credible, and get ideas for where to turn for accurate nutrition information.

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information
Tuesday, June 7 at 3pm Pacific Time
FREE and open to the public
SIGN UP TODAY!

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Don’t be gullible. Sign up for my class and stop falling for bad nutrition information.

Beat-the-Heat Recipes (43 no-cook, microwave, slow-cooker, and outdoor grill recipes)

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Photo Credit: Ken Marshall via Flickr, Used unmodified under CC BY 2.0 license

If you don’t want to add to the heat by heating your oven or cooking on the stove, no-cook, microwave, and slow-cooker recipes are the way to go. Or, if you have shade, keep the cooking heat outdoors by cooking on the grill.

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18 NO-COOK Recipes

8 MICROWAVE Recipes

8 SLOW-COOKER Recipes

9 OUTDOOR GRILLING Recipes

Read more:

5 Quick and Healthy Meals without Using the Stove

25 Healthy Snacks for Kids (…or anyone. Many don’t require cooking)

Heart-healthy grilling recipes

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Happy Dietitian Day!

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) Day is almost over, but that isn’t going to stop me from posting about it! 😉

Dietitians are food and nutrition experts who have at least a bachelor’s level education along with supervised training in multiple areas of dietetics, have passed a national exam, and participate in continuing education every year.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics posted about some of the things that a dietitian can do for you, including

  • helping you understand food labels,
  • giving you tips about eating for improved athletic performance,
  • suggesting flavorful additions to make sure your healthy food isn’t boring food, and
  • helping you figure out how to enjoyably treat yourself to special foods – without guilt or bingeing.

Dietitians also work in many other ways, including fighting for anti-hunger causes, researching nutrition treatments for diseases like cancers or heart disease, and working with farmers to help create sustainable food systems.

Click to read the post about how a RDN can help you reach your health goals.

If you would like to find a dietitian to help you on your health journey, you can use the Academy’s Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist feature, where you can search by location and specialty.

Do you know a dietitian? Please thank them for the work they do. 🙂

Reducing Sodium: From Menu to Mouth (Infographic and text from the CDC)

Reducing Sodium: From Menu to Mouth. Excess sodium can lead to high blood pressure, a major contributor to heart disease and stroke. Home prepared meals have less sodium than meals prepared in fast food or sit down restaurants. What Can You Do? Ask for sodium content before ordering, or check online before eating out. Home prepared meals have less sodium per calorie than meals prepared in fast food or sit down restaurants, on average. Food from fast food restaurants contains 1,848 mg sodium per 1,000 calories, on average. Food from sit-down restaurants contains 2,090 mg sodium per 1,000 calories, on average. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg/day, and about 6 in 10 adults should further limit sodium to 1,500 mg/day*. Choose wisely to stay under 2,300 mg**. Top 6 Sources of Sodium from Restaurant Foods1,2: 1. 170 to 7,260mg sodium per sandwich. 2. 393 to 4,163mg sodium per slice of pizza containing meat. 3. 200 to 2,940 mg per burger. 4. 62 to 7,358 mg sodium per chicken entrée). 5. 250 to 4,870 mg per Mexican entrée. 6. 4 to 4,530 mg sodium per salad)* *Refers to those age 51 and older, and those of any age with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease. ** Averages are for 2012–2013. 1 IOM Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States. 2 Sodium content was determined using MenuStat.org. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Infographic and text from Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Click to go to the CDC webpage about Salt/Sodium

Reducing Sodium: From Menu to Mouth

Excess sodium can lead to high blood pressure, a major contributor to heart disease and stroke. Home prepared meals have less sodium than meals prepared in fast food or sit down restaurants.

What Can You Do?

Ask for sodium content before ordering, or check online before eating out. Home prepared meals have less sodium per calorie than meals prepared in fast food or sit down restaurants, on average. Food from fast food restaurants contains 1,848 mg sodium per 1,000 calories, on average. Food from sit-down restaurants contains 2,090 mg sodium per 1,000 calories, on average.

The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg/day, and about 6 in 10 adults should further limit sodium to 1,500 mg/day*. Choose wisely to stay under 2,300 mg**.

Top 6 Sources of Sodium from Restaurant Foods (1,2):

  • 170 to 7,260 mg sodium per sandwich.
  • 393 to 4,163 mg sodium per slice of pizza containing meat.
  • 200 to 2,940 mg per burger.
  • 62 to 7,358 mg sodium per chicken entrée.
  • 250 to 4,870 mg per Mexican entrée.
  • 4 to 4,530 mg sodium per salad

*Refers to those age 51 and older, and those of any age with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease.
**Averages are for 2012–2013.

References

  1. IOM Strategies to Reduce Sodium Intake in the United States.
  2. Sodium content was determined using MenuStat.org.

Infographic and text from Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention