How to stabilize health compounds in chopped garlic – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This week’s tip is from Jill Weisenberger, Registered Dietitian and author of several nutrition books. She shares how to activate and stabilize garlic’s health-boosting compounds. You can find more simple tips like this in Jill’s second book The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition.

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Chop garlic 10 minutes before cooking.
Garlic likely decreases the risk of colorectal cancer and stomach cancer. It’s also studied for possible roles in heart disease prevention. Chopping or crushing garlic activates its natural health-boosting compounds. But heat instantly deactivates them. Allow the chopped or crushed garlic to sit at room temperature for at least 10 minutes before heating to stabilize the disease fighters.

–Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND, CHWC
Author, 21 Things You Need to Know about Diabetes and Your Heart and The Overworked Person’s Guide to Better Nutrition

Be sure to sign up to make sure you don’t miss future wellness tips.

Plan ahead for better success – OSC:Wellness tip

OSC:Wellness brings you “quick tip” changes for healthier living. A more balanced sense of wellness can come One Small Change at a time.

This One Small Change tip is from Torey Armul, a Registered Dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She encourages us to plan ahead for better wellness.

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Create a plan for what you’ll eat tomorrow, and when. Preparing and planning ahead is the key to success in any endeavor, including health and weight loss. Take a proactive role by creating a meal schedule, packing your foods ahead of time and setting personal reminders. Without a plan, it’s easy to lose track of your goals and lose control over your food environment (being surrounded by only unhealthy options, for example) and your appetite (going too long between meals builds the desire for unhealthy foods).

Torey Armul, MS, RD, CSSD
Registered Dietitian, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Be sure to sign up to make sure you don’t miss future wellness tips.

Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information

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Looking in the wrong place for nutrition information can cause you to make unnecessary or harmful diet changes, give up foods you don’t need to, and waste money on special supplements and products.

How do you know what information you can trust, whether online, from friends, or in the news?

Join me in the Diabetes Smart Online Symposium to learn how to determine whether a source is credible, and get ideas for where to turn for accurate nutrition information.

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Can you trust it? How to find credible and accurate nutrition information
Tuesday, June 7 at 3pm Pacific Time
FREE and open to the public
SIGN UP TODAY!

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Don’t be gullible. Sign up for my class and stop falling for bad nutrition information.

Happy Dietitian Day!

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) Day is almost over, but that isn’t going to stop me from posting about it! 😉

Dietitians are food and nutrition experts who have at least a bachelor’s level education along with supervised training in multiple areas of dietetics, have passed a national exam, and participate in continuing education every year.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics posted about some of the things that a dietitian can do for you, including

  • helping you understand food labels,
  • giving you tips about eating for improved athletic performance,
  • suggesting flavorful additions to make sure your healthy food isn’t boring food, and
  • helping you figure out how to enjoyably treat yourself to special foods – without guilt or bingeing.

Dietitians also work in many other ways, including fighting for anti-hunger causes, researching nutrition treatments for diseases like cancers or heart disease, and working with farmers to help create sustainable food systems.

Click to read the post about how a RDN can help you reach your health goals.

If you would like to find a dietitian to help you on your health journey, you can use the Academy’s Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist feature, where you can search by location and specialty.

Do you know a dietitian? Please thank them for the work they do. 🙂

Kids Eat Right Month is a Family Matter

Father Feeding Child In Kitchen by marin via FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Photo credit: marin via FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This month (August) is called Kids Eat Right Month, but kids (like all of us) need support for healthy behaviors. And depending on the age of the kids, some need more support than others since they don’t make fully independent choices yet.

“Parents and caregivers can play a big role in children’s nutrition and health, teaching kids about healthy foods, being a good role model and making sure physical activity is incorporated into each day,” says a reprintable article from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

They also offer five tips you can use to help your whole family (no matter what their ages) be healthier:

Shop Smart. To encourage a healthy lifestyle, get your children involved in selecting the food that will appear at the breakfast, lunch or dinner table.

Cook Healthy. Involve your child in the cutting, mixing and preparation of meals. They will learn about food and may even be enticed to try new foods they helped prepare.

Eat Right. Sit down together as a family to enjoy a wonderful meal and the opportunity to share the day’s experiences with one another. Research indicates that those families who eat together have a stronger bond, and children have higher self-confidence and perform better in school.

Healthy Habits. You can help kids form great, healthy habits by setting a good example. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, choose lower-sodium options, and make at least half the grains your family eats whole grains. For beverages, choose water over sugary drinks, and opt for fat-free or low-fat milk.

Get Moving. Aside from being a great way to spend time together, regular physical activity is vital to strengthen muscle and bones, promote a healthy body weight, support learning, develop social skills and build self-esteem. Kids are encouraged to be active for 60 minutes per day.

For more tips, recipes, and ideas for children and teens of every age, visit the Kids section of the Eat Right website (www.eatright.org).

“Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right”

Food by NickNguyen on Flickr
Photo Credit: Nick Nguyen (NickNguyen) on Flickr
Used unmodified under CC BY-SA 2.0 license

March is National Nutrition Month ®. This year’s theme is “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.” It focuses on “how to combine taste and nutrition to create healthy meals that follow the Dietary Guidelines recommendations” (Source: National Nutrition Month page on Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website).

In a January press release, Constance Brown-Riggs, a registered dietitian and Academy spokesperson, said that “there is a whole world of tasty and nutritious foods available today that are just waiting to be discovered. Adding more nutrition and pleasure to each meal is as easy as expanding the range of foods you choose.”

The Academy offers these tips for trying new tastes in healthy meals:

At the grocery store:

When shopping, make it a point to try one new fruit, vegetable or whole grain every week. “You can start small by picking a different type of apple, a different color potato or a new flavor of whole-grain rice until you are comfortable picking entirely new things that you’ve never tried or heard of before,” Brown-Riggs says.

Eating at restaurants:

The next time you and your family head out to eat, choose a restaurant that features ethnic foods from Asia, Europe or Africa. These restaurants often feature menus filled with healthy options that will be new to you. “You can also find a local restaurant that specializes in using seasonal ingredients. Frequently you will be able to order your favorite dish but with a new and exciting flavor twist,” Brown-Riggs says.

Cooking at home:

Add variety to your staple dishes by varying the ways you cook them. Grill or broil the chicken you typically bake. Mash the potatoes you typically roast. Steam the vegetables you typically sauté. And get to know your spice cabinet. “A pinch of this and a dash of that can add a fresh zest to an old favorite,” Brown-Riggs says.

(Quoted from the above press release)

Here are several places to get tasty, healthy recipes (with a sample recipe from each):

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Recipe Page
-(sample: Cucumber-Mint Raita)

USDA’s SNAP-Ed Connection Recipe Finder
-(sample: Asparagus with Gremolata Sauce)

American Heart Association Recipe Page
-(sample: Devil’s Food Cupcakes with Almond-Mocha Topping on Raspberry Sauce)

American Cancer Society Recipe Page
-(sample: Greek Chicken with Tomatoes, Peppers, Olives, Feta)

Which nutritious foods taste best to you? Leave a comment below.

Want to learn more about food and nutrition, including getting more recipes? Click here to get free blog updates sent to your inbox.